Hidden Books @ University of Iowa’s Special Collections Department

Columbian Hand Press adorns the entrance to the University of Iowa Special Collections Reading Room
Columbian Hand Press adorns the entrance to the University of Iowa Special Collections Reading Room

I visited the University of Iowa’s Special Collections library on Tuesday and Wednesday for a couple of hours. While I didn’t know what I would find, I was hoping there’d be something.

The director, Greg Prickman took a few minutes out of his busy schedule to speak with me and talk about how the collection was amassed. There are quite a few incunabula (books printed before 1501) which were acquired from Classics professors donating their collections to permanent loans to purchases to fill out the history of printing subject area.

The Universal Penman by George Bickham at the University of Iowa Special Collections
The Universal Penman by George Bickham at the University of Iowa Special Collections
The Universal Penman by George Bickham at the University of Iowa's Special Collections Reading Room
The Universal Penman by George Bickham at the University of Iowa’s Special Collections Reading Room
The Universal Penman by George Bickham X 3 @ UI Special Collections
The Universal Penman by George Bickham X 3 @ UI Special Collections

I discovered that they have 4 writing manuals. Three copies of G. Bickham’s Universal Penman from 1733 and two later dates as well as a 1585 copy of Scalzini’s Il secretario.

EDIT:

Scalzini is known for his flourishes or “command of hand.” He argued that a light touch and quick execution was necessary for a successful commercial scribe. Attacking his senior, Giovanni Francesco Cresci as spending too much time on careful execution and too-sharp a pen nib, Scalzini’s scathing remarks became standard fare for writing-master wars.

Marcello Scalzini portrait @ 24. In the front of Il Secretario 1585 at the University of Iowa Special Collections
Marcello Scalzini portrait @ 25. In the front of Il Secretario 1585 at the University of Iowa Special Collections
Scalzini's Il Secretario 1585 at the University of Iowa Special Collections
Scalzini’s Il Secretario 1585 at the University of Iowa Special Collections
Scalzini's Il Secretario 1585 at the University of Iowa Special Collections
Scalzini’s Il Secretario 1585 at the University of Iowa Special Collections
An inverted manicule in the letterpress section of Il Secretario by Scalzini at the University of Iowa Special Collections
An inverted manicule in the letterpress section of Il Secretario by Scalzini at the University of Iowa Special Collections

In visiting Iowa’s Special Collections reading room, I was impressed by how inviting and comfortable it was as a first time reader to get acclimated. Each library has its own style, rules and etiquette. Iowa welcomes its scholars with a directness and warmth that made me feel welcome instantly. The system for searching and discovering material is straightforward as is the requesting of items for research.

I look forward to going back when I have more than a couple of hours to delve into their collection further.

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Breakdown on the Highway

A Columbian Press at the Houston Printing History Museum
A Columbian Press at the Houston Printing History Museum
After breakfast at Hotel ZaZa, Houston, TX
After breakfast at Hotel ZaZa, Houston, TX

After my time in Austin, I visited my sister in Houston and headed up Hwy 59 on my way to the University of Iowa’s Center for the Book. I wanted to speak with Tim Barrett about renaissance papers and what, if any, differences there might be in the paper used for printing on wood as opposed to metal.

I traveled up a state road that feeds the eastern part of Texas north to south. About 90 miles outside of Houston, my motorcycle quit. I’d fueled up 45 miles before, so I didn’t think it could be fuel. It had been running fine, so it couldn’t have become starved for air and that left fire – or spark. I checked battery connections, fuel pump operation, fuel filter. All were in order. I had spoken to a friend on the phone a few times and was somewhat warm as it was noon and in the 90s.

Breakdown on Hwy 59, Texas
Breakdown on Hwy 59, Texas

As I started to take the tank off, a pickup truck pulled up behind me and  the guy asked what the problem was. I explained briefly and he offered to help. He said that he had a dual sport (off-road and on-road) and I asked what kind.
His early 2000s BMW GS 1150 had served him well and he liked it. Then he asked if I rode much and I mentioned my previous cross country trips on an old 80s BMW RS100. He seemed to relax and commented that I wasn’t a new rider. We chatted as I pulled the gas tank off and continued to troubleshoot. Discovering nothing out of sorts such as a disconnected coil wire or spark plug wired unconnected, I was stumped.

Deconstructed bike on the highway
Deconstructed bike on the highway

My new friend Dave offered to drive me and my tank, body panels and gear up the road 90 miles to my friend, Lisa Steed’s house. I had intended to visit her on my way north to Iowa. Dave suggested leaving the bike there as he couldn’t haul it in his covered truck. I could rent a trailer and come back for the bike with Lisa and he would travel only  a few miles out of his way.

As we talked, he developed a further plan to find a trailer nearby, renting it and then Lisa and I could return it. As it happened, Baskin’s Hadware in Corrigan came into view and we stopped. They sold larger items and I thought I saw a trailer in the back as we passed. We went into the old country hardware store and were greeted warmly by four men ranging in age. Dave asked the owner if they rented trailers. The man said “No, we don’t.”

“But you can borrow one.

“We close at 6:30.”

Dave took this in and the owner said: “We’re country, that’s how we do it here.” To which Dave replied: “I’m country too – and that’s what we do up in Toledo Bend.”

We loaded the bike and stowed my gear and headed north to Nacogdoches. After unloading, Dave said he’d take the trailer back himself, wouldn’t take anything, just said he was making a deposit in his karma bank.

At the Nacogdoches motorcycle recovery center
At the Nacogdoches motorcycle recovery center

My friends, Lisa and Rodney fed me, put me up for the night and then helped me work on the bike on Sunday. At some point I suggested Lisa give the bike a wave of her healing hands as a joke, and the bike started after that.

After a twenty mile ride up the Loonieville Road, I packed up and headed out. I made it to Texarkana that night, 150 miles away and stopped at sundown.

Having lost a day, I was back on the road with a mysterious electrical problem but feeling quite fortunate to have made a new friend.

Thanks, Dave – travel safe on that GS.

Hidden Books!

Comparing 2 copies of Compendio del Gran Volume de L'Arte... by G. Palatino. 1566 & (?) at the Harry Ransom Center
Comparing 2 copies of Compendio del Gran Volume de L’Arte… by G. Palatino. 1566 & (?) at the Harry Ransom Center

My stay in Austin was productive, if a bit confusing. Finding books in the catalog and discovering the full extent of the collection took most of my time. I did get to view a few books and learn about writing manual acquisition at the Ransom Center. I thought I’d be looking at works in the Marzoli and Beaufoy collections of up to 120 + books.

Calligraphy: 1535 – 1885, published in 1962 as a sale catalog of 72 writing manuals was considered the standard for describing this type of book. The Ransom Center acquired the collection in 1962. In 1967, they acquired a collection of scrapbooks called the Beaufoy Collection.

Title page of a volume from the Beaufoy Collection at the Harry Ransom Center
Title page of a volume from the Beaufoy Collection at the Harry Ransom Center

In 1850 this collection of 48 writing manuals was created by Henry B. H. Beaufoy and acquired by the Humanities Research Center (now the Harry Ransom Center). The cataloging for this set is very simple:

Description 48 v. in 11. illus. 53 cm.
Local note All manuals have been disbound, and either inlaid or mounted, and then rebound.
Each vol. has ms. title: “Calligraphy being a collection of the most celebrated writing masters, English and foreign, 1539 to 1840 … London, 1845[-1850]”
Binder’s numbering of vols. is inconsecutive (probably to allow for growth in the collection) from I Sup to XII.
Armorial bookplate of Henry B.H. Beaufoy.

As you can see from this, there’s no indication of what these 48 titles are. There are some additional materials that can help. The Ransom Center keeps some records and correspondence associated with the collection and this file can be requested. I knew about the collections file, and asked for it. Within the subject heading of calligraphy, the Hamill & Barker sale list is included. A much photocopied list of the books. Listed by England/date and then Continent/date.

Included in the collections file was a listing of books offered to the Ransom Center by Harvey W. Brewer. The typewritten catalog states: An important collection of 56 58 (penciled in) WRITING BOOKS of the 16th thru the 19th century, rich in the masters of ENGLAND, ITALY, FRANCE, SPAIN, the NETHERLANDS & GERMANY.

There were a  number of titles that were similar to the Marzoli titles. But in viewing the Marzoli printed catalog, then going to the UT online catalog, I was confused as similar titles might have two or more listings. The Marzoli Palatino Compendio del gran volvme de l’arte … has no date in the call number: Z 43 A3 P343. I called up the two titles the online catalog offered. One copy had the Marzoli bookseller’s tag in it, the other had handwritten notes on the pastedown and it’s call number varied by date: Z 43 A3 P3 1566. I had similar things happen when I called up two other titles with similar call numbers.

From Andrade de Fibueyredo's Nova Escola Para Aprender a ler ... at the Ransom Center
From Andrade de Fibueyredo’s Nova Escola Para Aprender a ler … at the Ransom Center

Had the Ransom Center enlarged its collection of writing manuals beyond Marzoli and Beaufoy? If so, when? I sent a query out to ExLibris to see if someone knew what became of Brewer. I couldn’t find an active website, phone or address for the firm, and some additional searching led me to the Grolier Club’s collecting a number of their catalogs. Folks on the ExLibris list were helpful and sent me information.

I asked the staff for help and learned that there is an archive of the HRHRC which has correspondence and other information pertinent to the collection. This lead to a file on the Brewer collection and correspondence with the Brewer firm about the purchase of these books.

Letter from Harvey W. Brewer to Mrs. Hudspeth at the Humanities Research Center describing shipment of type specimens and writing manuals in 1969
Letter from Brewer describing shipment of type specimens and writing manuals in 1969

My confusion when studying the online catalog was that there were two copies of a title, but they differed by date or publisher. And they were clearly from two “collections” as the Marzoli items were often rebound in vellum and the Brewer items had penciled in notes on the flyleaf by the same hand.

The Ransom Center has over 180 writing manuals in its collection and they are some of the finest books to have been published.

Thanks to the diligent staff, I was able to make my way through the labyrinth of acquisitions records, uploaded  records from paper to online (where the records aren’t always complete!) and other bibliographic hitches that keep things hidden in plain view.

Ugo da Carpi "Thesauro de Scrittori Opera ..." at the Ransom Center. 1525 Blado at top
Ugo da Carpi “Thesauro de Scrittori Opera …” at the Ransom Center. 1525 Blado at top
From the text of Andrade de Figueyredo's Nova Escola Para Aprender a ler ... at the Harry Ransom Center
From the text of Andrade de Figueyredo’s Nova Escola Para Aprender a ler … at the Harry Ransom Center
Binder's ticket on Beaufoy volumes
Binder’s ticket on Beaufoy volumes

Have quill, will travel

I’ve stopped overnight in Santa Fe, NM at my brother Jamie’s house. The 1,300 mile ride has been enjoyable, and I’m only a day or two behind in getting to my first library destination, the Harry Ransom Center in Austin, TX.

Writing manuals not only taught stroke sequence, or ductus, they also taught how to cut and hold the quill pen. Various feathers have been used but goose and turkey quills are commonly used today. The primary flight feather is considered the best quill to use for writing.

One of the things I like about calligraphy is that the tools are simple, fairly small and light-weight and can be handled easily. I prepared for my trip by cutting the feathers off a number of turkey quills. I’ve packed two different quill knives, some ink and gouache so that I can demonstrate along the way. I hope to demonstrate quill cutting and talk about these books as I ride to institutions with writing manuals.

Quills for travel
Quills, knives, ink, gouache and other tools for making marks
How to hold the quill pen
How to hold the quill pen

The Harry Ransom Center acquired the Marzoli collection of written manuals in 1962. Her catalog of seventy-two writing books will aid in my research. I will also spend time with the Beaufoy collection of writing manuals that have been disbound and mounted scrapbook-style in large 19th century tooled bindings. There promise to be many discoveries in these 7 volumes which house about 50 books.

Beaufoy binding holding writing manuals pasted within scrapbook-style
Beaufoy binding housing writing manuals pasted scrapbook-style
Neudorfer the Elder, pasted into Beaufoy volume at Harry Ransom Center
Neudorfer the Elder, pasted into Beaufoy volume at Harry Ransom Center
IMG_6730
Title page from Vol. 2 of Beaufoy’s collection

Both the Beaufoy and Marzoli collections illustrate how traveling to an institution and talking with librarians aid an online census for these books. Neither of these two collections are cataloged with full information. Rich Orem was instructive in pointing out things about each that weren’t in the catalog.

Reviewing the books I’ve seen, the Marzoli catalog as well as the scholarly papers held with these materials will give me my first chance to develop a dialog and working procedure that I can take to other institutions.

Departure

Coffee in Berkeley just days before leaving
Coffee in Berkeley just days before leaving Photo C. Stinehour

The Motoscribendi tour rolls out in a few hours. I packed all my clothes and camping gear, now the hard part comes: Getting the traveling writing kit together – pens, inks, paper, etc.

Packing the bike
Packing up to leave. Photo M. Smith

The t-shirts are done as you can see and have already been shipped out, so that’s been a relief to have accomplished. Thanks to Meg Smith, other fulfillment will be done while I’m gone. And she and her boyfriend are taking their bikes to escort me to Sacramento on Delta roads and twisties just to get things going.

Where am I going?

I’ve come to the conclusion that an itinerary will help – even if I change things up along the way. The list below is my first attempt at routing.

August 6th – Saturday 8th: Oakland/Santa Fe, NM
August 10th – Tuesday 11th: Santa Fe/Austin
August 12 – 18 Austin, TX
August 18 – 21 Houston
August 22 – 23 Houston/Iowa City
August 24 – 25 Iowa City, IA
August 26 Iowa City/Chicago
August 27 – September 2 Chicago, IL
Sept. 2 Chicago/Ann Arbor, MI
Sept. 3 – 4 Ann Arbor & Detroit, MI
Sept. 5 – 6 Detroit/Charlottesville
Sept. 6 – 7 Charlottesville, VA
Sept. 8 – 9 Richmond, VA
Sept. 10 Richmond/Washington, D.C.
Sept 11 – 15 Washington, DC
Sept. 16 Washington, DC/Princeton
Sept. 17 -18 Princeton, NJ
Sept. 19 Princeton/NYC
Sept. 20 – 26 NYC
Sept 27 NYC/New Haven
Sept 28 – 29 New Haven, CT
Sept. 30 New Haven/Worcester
Oct. 1 – 3 Worcester, MA
Oct. 4 Worcester/Cambridge
Oct. 5 – 8 Cambridge, MA
Oct. 9 -10 Hanover, NH
Oct 11 Hanover/Scranton, PA
Oct. 12 Scranton/Philadelphia
Oct 13 – 14 Philadelphia, PA
Oct. 14 Philadelphia/Cleveland
Oct. 15 – 17 GBW, Cleveland, OH
Oct. 23 – 24 APHA Rochester, NY
Oct. 25 – 31 Return to CA, no fixed itinerary

Remember, this is a motorcycle tour of libraries that have writing manuals and copybooks, and to keep that in mind, here’s a few more items to look at.

Palatino 1588 Bancroft Library
Palatino 1588 Bancroft Library Photo NGY
Horfei @ Harry Ransom Center Photo NY
Horfei @ Harry Ransom Center Photo NGY

I’ll see you in a few days with a report.

Many Thanks!

Many Thanks!
Many Thanks

Thanks to all who contributed  to Motoscribendi!

The final count was $6,579 and this will allow me to print and make all the Perks (they will begin going out next week) and then allow me at least 45 days on the road. While 45 days isn’t a long time to travel 12,000 miles and visit almost 20 libraries (yes, the number has increased since I started this!) I will still spend a few days at each institution and gather information, look at the books and work with librarians to develop the Census.

Below are some shots Jennie Hinchcliff took at a presentation I made at the Letterform Archive.

Motoscribendi smacky prints
Motoscribendi smacky prints
Bookcase at the Letterform Archive
Bookcase at the Letterform Archive
Pointing out a manuscript exemplar at the Letterform Archive
Pointing out a manuscript exemplar at the Letterform Archive
Van de Velde & copy
Van de Velde & copy
Pairings from bamboo pens cut by Ward Dunham
Parings from bamboo pens cut by Ward Dunham

I owe a ton of thanks to a number of people who encouraged me as well as helped organize the project. Next week I’ll get things organized enough to do a proper thank you as I have been scrambling to get all the artwork completed, sent to printers: T-shirt, sticker and offset printers.

I will be on the road by Wednesday night, August 5th. And I’ll probably leave at 8:00 pm and make all of 100 miles before I stop! I’ll continue the blog from the road.

Travel plans, computers and artwork

T-Shirt for Notary Perk on Indiegogo campaign
T-Shirt for Notary Perk on Indiegogo campaign

Despite a computer logic board failure and internet connectivity issues, I’ve managed to make progress on the Perks for the Indiegogo campaign. The above t-shirt proof shows how the logo will print on the shirt. And I’ll be able to load a few more pictures in the coming days once I get my computer back.

I am set to leave on August 5th – less than two weeks away. That time will go quickly with printing and publishing and binding.

Oh yeah, and packing for a 3 month trip. What does one pack as a traveling researcher?

Laptop (that works!)

Clothes – hot and cold, wet & dry – but not too many, this isn’t a fashion shoot!

Camping gear – between libraries there are vast areas of the great outdoors to visit and sleep in. Libraries are great, but so is fresh air, sunshine and starlight

Writing and binding tools and equipment. I’m a traveling scribe and binder, and I’ll take a kit of tools and materials with me so that I can write and make things along the way (more on that in the coming days)

Motorcycle tools to repair things that break or vibrate loose. I’ll have new tires put on next Friday, along with a fresh oil change

The great Southwest
The great Southwest

I’m getting pretty excited!

Libraries, Calligraphy Manuals and Motorcycles